Tuscany is the land of Chianti Wine: Arezzo, Florence, Pisa, Pistoia, Prato and Siena are provinces which represent places of productive excellence, the soils of which are cultivated with vines destined for the production of Chianti wine, and they are delimited by the regulations and the law. This unique environment, crossed by gently rolling terraced hills, by valleys and rivers, offers prestigious vineyards, the symbol of the Tuscan landscape. Today, antique cellars become architecture to visit and places for tourism and tastings.

The delimited geographic zone suited to the production of Chianti docg wine, falls within the central part of the Tuscany region, and partly includes the hill territories close to the Apennines in the provinces of Arezzo, Florence, Pistoia, Pisa, Prato and Siena.

Chianti is born in a quite homogeneous geological area, situated south of the Apennines and between the latitudes that comprise Florence and Siena. One strip begins in the north, from the Mugello area towards Rufina and Pontassieve, continuing along the Chianti hills to include the territory of the Municipality of Cetona. The other originates on Montalbano and is linked to the Val di Pesa, heading towards San Gimignano and Montalcino. The central nucleus is surrounded by extensions linked to the hill systems of the Arezzo and Siena districts, and those of Pistoia, Pisa and Prato. These extreme and peripheral strips are connected by transversal links. In particular, from a geological point of view, the territory of Chianti, due to its vast extension, can be split into four systems, in decreasing order of age: Mio-Eocene pre-Apennine ridges, Pliocene hills, the inter-mountain basin of Valdarno Superiore with its Pleistocene deposits, and the alluvial deposits. The altitude of the hills cultivated with vines is between 200 and 400 m above sea level on average, with suitable slopes and exposures.

The climate of the area falls within the so-called climatic complex of the interior Tuscan hills. The climate of the district can be described as being from “humid” to “sub-humid”, with water shortages in summer. The average annual rainfall is 867 mm, with a minimum of 817 mm and a maximum of 932 mm. The maximum rainfall is usually recorded in November, with 121 mm, with the minimum of 32 mm in July. The month of August is usually the hottest, with average temperatures of over 23°C, while the coldest month is usually January, with average temperatures of around 5°C.

 

Chianti wine can be made all over the Chianti zone, including those areas not identified in the key and shown here in light grey.

 

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